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Day Overcomes Beastie

Mike Day defeated Jason Ladbrook nickname Beastie in the final of Harrows DPNZ men’s Grand Prix yesterday held at the Papakura club 7 legs to 3. Mike’s winning legs were 18, 19, 17, 20, 18, 22 and 18 darts. Jason’s winning legs were 24, 19 and 17 darts.

Mike played Charie Mariu in the semi final and won 6 legs to 3.  Charlie started well with two 16 darters and two 180’s. Then Mike won the next 5 legs with 22, 19, 18, 14, 16 darts. Charlie pulled one back with a 20 darter and then Mike hit a 15 darter to seal victory.

The field was a small one of only 36 players.

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Felicity Whitley Wins Grand Papakura Ladies Grand Prix

Congratulations to Felicity Whitley of the West City Darts Association defeating Lorene Gilliam in the final of the DPNZ  Harrows Grand Prix Ladies final held at Papakura yesterday. Both ladies have the winning habit. The picture shows them winning the Auckland ladies area pairs in February. Only 11 ladies in the field which was probably disappointing to the organisers but some very good players in that  small field. No mean achievement for Felicity to win.

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People Of Darts – Jason Ladbrook

Pictured is Jason Ladbrook ( nickname Beastie) , NZDC number 16 and current NZDC mens pair champion with Bernie Smith, playing for the Manuwera Cosmopolitan Club in the Wednesday night Auckland Chartered Club league against the Onehunga Working Mens Club  at Onehunga earlier this evening. Jason of course is a true Canterbury stalwart but now residing in Auckland through a job transfer. You will note he is still wearing his NZDC Region 14 representative jacket even though he is playing in a chartered club league and for an Auckland Club. A  true red and black. Jason won his four singles match and pairs match to assist Manuwera in defeating Onehunga 13 to 5.

 

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From The Daily Mail : How to Always Win At Darts

How to ALWAYS win at darts: Expert reveals the way to use poor aim to your advantage and which sequence of numbers boosts your chances of success

  • Expert from Nottingham has explained the best strategy for amateurs
  • It uses a method devised by a statistician that takes accuracy into account
  • Those with an accuracy of 25mm should aim for treble 19 to hit treble 20
  • Players should also leave a power of two to widen alternatives if they miss

There are many variants of the game of darts, but by far the most common sees players start with a score of 501 and take turns to bring this score down.

The aim is to hit zero using as few darts as possible, and professional players can win a game in just nine darts.

However, amateurs can also improve their game, and reach zero faster, by using their poor aim to their advantage.

Graham Kendall from the University of Nottingham explains the best strategy for amateurs, and discusses whether the dart board design needs a makeover.

The aim in darts is typically to hit zero using as few darts as possible, and professional players can win a game in just nine darts. However, amateurs use a poor aim to their advantage. Graham Kendall from the University of Nottingham explains the best strategy to win every time - or at least boost your chances of success

The aim in darts is typically to hit zero using as few darts as possible, and professional players can win a game in just nine darts. However, amateurs use a poor aim to their advantage. Graham Kendall from the University of Nottingham explains the best strategy to win every time – or at least boost your chances of success

Writing on The Conversation, Professor Kendal explained how the layout of a darts board is a circle cut into 20 equal arcs, with an inner and outer bullseye at the centre, and two rings – one halfway and one on the outer rim of the circle, representing treble and double scores respectively.

The board was designed by Brian Gamlin in 1896, with the idea that by placing large numbers next to small numbers, mistakes are heavily penalised.

For example, if you aim for 20 and are off target, you will score five or one by hitting one of the arcs that lie to either side.

Similarly, 19 is penalised by inaccurate throws landing in the neighbouring arcs scoring three or seven.

IMPROVE YOUR CHANCES OF WINNING AT DARTS

Ryan Tibshirani, in his article Don’t try for triple 20: Where to aim if you are bad at darts, suggests that excellent players – those who throw with an accuracy within 5mm – should aim for the treble 20.

But less accurate players should take alternative strategies.

Those accurate to within 25mm should aim at treble 19.

Those accurate to only 60mm can essentially achieve the same maximum by aiming in a large spot around the centre, with the optimal spot to the lower-left of the bullseye.

A poor player aiming for treble 20 would average 10.2 points per throw, worse than the 12.8 points from just throwing randomly.

In a scientific paper detailing these findings, Tibshirani also gives a detailed description of how to determine accuracy, however a simplified method involves throwing a series of darts and recording where they fall.

For example, a person could throw three darts while aiming for the treble 20 and measure the distance between where each dart lands from the target.

The average will give an indication of a person’s accuracy, and the more darts that are thrown, the more accurate the overall result.

The difficulty is increased by the fact that the rules of the 501-down game require that the last dart thrown must hit a double.

Statistician Ryan Tibshirani wrote in his article, titled Don’t try for triple 20: Where to aim if you are bad at darts, that professional players – those who throw with an accuracy within 5mm (less than a fifth of an inch) – should aim for the treble 20.

But less accurate players should take alternative strategies.

Those accurate to within 25mm (just under one inch) should aim at treble 19, for example, close to the border it shares with the seven.

Those accurate to just 60mm (two inches) can essentially achieve the same maximum by aiming in a large spot around the centre, with the optimal spot to the lower-left of the bullseye.

A poor player aiming for treble 20 would average 10.2 points per throw, worse than the 12.8 points from just throwing randomly.

In a scientific paper detailing these findings, Tibshirani also gives a detailed description of how to determine accuracy.

A simplified version of his method involves throwing a series of darts and recording where they fall.

For example, a person could throw three darts while aiming for the treble 20 and measure the distance between where each dart lands from the target.

The average will give an indication of a person’s accuracy, and the more darts that are thrown, the more accurate the overall result.

Kendall continued that players should also try to leave a power of two each time – two, four, eight, 16 and 32 – as this score gives more alternatives should a player miss the final double.

For example, if trying to finish the game on a score of 32, they will aim for double 16. If they hit 16, then their next shot is to aim for double 8.

This is better than leaving, say, 38 but hitting 19, so now there’s an odd number remaining which requires at least two darts to finish the game.

A statistician generated heatmaps (pictured left) of a dart board to track where players of different abilities hit the board. These heatmaps suggest that professional players - those who throw with an accuracy within 5mm - should aim for the treble 20 (pictured right)

A statistician generated heatmaps (pictured left) of a dart board to track where players of different abilities hit the board. These heatmaps suggest that professional players – those who throw with an accuracy within 5mm – should aim for the treble 20 (pictured right)

Less accurate players should take alternative strategies. Those accurate to within 25mm, for example, should aim at treble 19 when attempting to hit the treble 20 (pictured)
Meanwhile, those accurate to just 60mm can essentially achieve the same maximum by aiming in a large spot around the centre, with the optimal spot to the lower-left of the bullseye (pictured right)

Less accurate players should take alternative strategies. Those accurate to within 25mm, for example, should aim at treble 19 when attempting to hit the treble 20 (left). Meanwhile, those accurate to just 60mm can essentially achieve the same maximum by aiming in a large spot around the centre (pictured right)

Given that the dartboard is more than 100 years old, Kendall also explained that there may be a better design that might improve on the original.

For instance, a better sequence for the arcs on a dartboard could include 20, 1, 19, 3, 17, 5, 15, 7, 13, 9, 11, 10, 12, 8, 14, 6, 16, 4, 18, 2.

This solution maximises the penalties to non-perfect players – those likely to hit adjacent arcs – rather than those being aimed at.

Other researchers have changed the criteria slightly.

Kendall continued that players should also try to leave a power of two each time - two, four, eight, 16 and 32 - as this score gives more alternatives should a player miss the final double. If trying to finish the game on a score of 32, they will aim for double 16. If they hit 16, then their next shot is to aim for double 8

Kendall continued that players should also try to leave a power of two each time – two, four, eight, 16 and 32 – as this score gives more alternatives should a player miss the final double. If trying to finish the game on a score of 32, they will aim for double 16. If they hit 16, then their next shot is to aim for double 8

David Percy, professor of mathematics at Salford University, arranged the numbers of a dartboard so that the risk is maximised, but in addition odd and even numbers are alternated, with different sectors offering similar risks and rewards.

At the time, a leading manufacturer of dartboards, Winmau, announced it would produce a version of this dartboard, although it has not been widely adopted.

However, while maths researchers have examined score and penalty maximisation for the game and suggestions have been made for other designs, it seems Gamlin’s dartboard from 1896 will continue to stand the test of time.

The Conversation

Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-3394307/How-win-darts-thanks-MATHS-using-poor-aim-advantage.html#ixzz4buyw4Eiq
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Research: Drunk Dart Players Throw Better !

The time a Johns Hopkins professor sought 34 gallons of whiskey for ‘research for educational purposes’

John B. Watson

Image caption:John B. Watson

IMAGE CREDIT: UNIVERSITY ARCHIVES

A rather unusual permit application resides in the Records of the Office of the President in the Johns Hopkins University Archives.

In April 1920, Professor John B. Watson, a psychologist credited as the father of behaviorism, applied for a permit to purchase 34 gallons of rye whiskey for “scientific research for educational purposes.” He wished to research the effects of alcohol on human functions, which might not seem surprising—except for the fact that Prohibition had become the law of the land just three months earlier.

It was illegal to “manufacture, sell, barter, transport, import, export, deliver, or furnish any intoxicating liquor except as authorized,” though consuming alcohol was not prohibited. Watson had to apply to the Office of the Federal Prohibition Commissioner for permission to obtain alcohol for use in his lab.

Watson apparently obtained the desired whiskey from the Pikesville Distillery. Alongside the permit is May 1920 correspondence with Watson’s colleague, Professor Edward Thorndike, who had conducted similar experiments. Watson outlined his plan and solicited Thorndike’s views, to which Thorndike responded, “I think your experiment is a very beautiful one indeed.”

Letter from the archives

Image caption:James B. Watson’s “Permit to Purchase Intoxicating Liquor, etc., for Other Than Beverage Purposes” (1920)

IMAGE CREDIT: UNIVERSITY ARCHIVES

In a comment to Thorndike, Watson describes having subjects throw darts from a certain distance over several hours, while he studied their performance as they consumed alcohol. He observed that, “One or two of the individuals became practically drunk, but apparently the drunker they got the better they shot!”

In June 1920, Watson outlined his experiments to University President Frank J. Goodnow, apparently seeking belated permission. (Perhaps he was simply following the adage that it’s easier to beg forgiveness afterward than to request permission in advance.) President Goodnow wondered if “such experiments are desirable and proper under existing conditions,” and when Watson forwarded copies of his correspondence with Thorndike and the permit to purchase whiskey, Goodnow asked Watson to discontinue his research until the Academic Council could study the matter. He warned Watson that “this is rather a dangerous field in which to make experiments.”

This episode took place long before institutional review boards were created to oversee experiments involving human subjects. Although Goodnow promised Watson the opportunity to justify his research before the Academic Council in the fall, other circumstances intervened. In September 1920, Watson resigned from Johns Hopkins after admitting to an affair with one of his graduate students, which resulted in a messy and public divorce. No further mention exists in the president’s records, leaving a permit for a barrel of whiskey—and some interesting correspondence—as the only evidence of this incident from the early days of Prohibition.

James Stimpert is the Senior Reference Archivist for The Sheridan Libraries

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Results: Week One King Of The Board: West City

Prize Pool : $36.00

Players: 12

Most Wins:

5- Stacey Heavey, Mike Day

4 -Ken Moir, Emma Heavey

3 -Hemi Johnson, Billie Johnson

2 -Frank Riddell

1 -Peter Page, Grant Douglas, Lloyd Watters, Sharmaine Watters

Most 180’s:

2 -Stacey Heavey, Ken Moir, Hemi Johnson

1- Billie Johnson, Frank Ridell

Best Legs:

13 darts – Mike Day, Frank Riddell

Most 100 + finishes: Mike Day (2), Hemi Johnson (1)

Last Game Finished 10.36 pm

Week 2 Monday 27 March $3 entry.